Visit The New, Modern Unix Linux Community


Ipv6 on hpux


 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Operating Systems HP-UX Ipv6 on hpux
# 1  
Ipv6 on hpux

my problem: i want to change from ipv4 to ipv6 on my home network.
On hpux i can assign only address non routable as fe80::1 fe80::3 etc to my lan0
Editing netconf-ipv6 i can assing a routable ipv6 address like
Code:
fd55:282f:3b98::/48

or
Code:
2001:470:26:307:89a0:aba1:f98b:eb3e

but only to alias interface like lan0:1,lan0:2
If i try to ping from other node fed80::1 is pingable,but ssh cannot reach it as host(using
etc/hosts) and fd55:282f:3b98::/48 is not pingable at all.
How to assign a correct ipv6 address to lan0?
Thanks

Previous Thread | Next Thread
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:
Advanced Search

Test Your Knowledge in Computers #709
Difficulty: Easy
In Linux, the 'useradd' command is a utility that is used for adding user accounts in Linux and other Unix-like operating systems.
True or False?

8 More Discussions You Might Find Interesting

1. Solaris

Solaris 10 IPv6

Hello Dears , please I need your support I have Oracle Solaris 10 X86 server please if you can advise how can I add IP v6 on my server and if IPv6 was disabled how can i enable it also how can i add two IP (v4 and v6) on the same interface or I have to add another interface . Thanks in... (1 Reply)
Discussion started by: ttashman
1 Replies

2. IP Networking

IPv6 Problems

I am trying to setup an IPv6 network. I modified the interfaces file: /etc/network/interfaces # The loopback network interface auto lo iface lo inet loopback iface etho0 inet static address 2620:7:a000::1 netmask 64 gateway ::ffff:c0a8:101 ... (0 Replies)
Discussion started by: Meow613
0 Replies

3. UNIX for Dummies Questions & Answers

Assigning ipv6 to bonding interface - getting old as well as changed ipv6 in ifconfig output

Hi, I have created a bonding bond1 interface with 6 Eth , mode=4. Recently i have changed my old ipv6 to new one and tried to restart as well as reload network service. Post which i can see old as well as changed ipv6 in ifconfig command output. Below are few files and command output for your... (1 Reply)
Discussion started by: omkar.jadhav
1 Replies

4. HP-UX

pwage-hpux-T for Trusted HPUX servers

I'm sharing this in case anybody needs it. Modified from the original solaris pwage script. This modified hpux script will check /etc/password file on hpux trusted systems search /tcb and grep the required u_succhg field. Calculate days to expiry and notify users via email. original solaris... (2 Replies)
Discussion started by: sparcguy
2 Replies

5. SuSE

Linux and IPv6

Hi gurus, In a few month, we must enable IPv6 on our Linux Server! Should we reinstall the Linux machine to enable IPv6 or could we just make some change in configuration's files? Could Linux run simultaneous IPv4 and IPv6? Thanks in advance for our help our ideas? Best regards, nm (3 Replies)
Discussion started by: hiddenshadow
3 Replies

6. Shell Programming and Scripting

Need Script to Use CPUs on a HPUX server to simulate Workload Manager on HPUX.

I am running HPUX and using WLM (workload manager). I want to write a script to fork CPUs to basically take CPUs from other servers to show that the communication is working and CPU licensing is working. Basically, I want to build a script that will use up CPU on a server. Any ideas? (2 Replies)
Discussion started by: cpolikowsky
2 Replies

7. AIX

IPv6 on AIX

Hi Every1, I want to configure IPv6 on AIX and want to communicate between IPv4 machine IP and IPv6 machine. Is it possible? (2 Replies)
Discussion started by: Shrek
2 Replies

8. IP Networking

IPv6 testbed

Hello guyz.. did some of u have implement or making a testbed for IPv6? if yes, can u attached the procedures and standard guidelines because i really need for my proposal.. thanx.. (2 Replies)
Discussion started by: unknown2205
2 Replies
routeadm(1M)															      routeadm(1M)

NAME
routeadm - IP forwarding and routing configuration SYNOPSIS
routeadm [-p] routeadm [-R root-dir] [-e option...] [-d option...] [-r option...] [-s var=value] routeadm [-u] The routeadm command is used to administer system-wide configuration for IP forwarding and routing. IP forwarding is the passing of IP packets from one network to another; IP routing is the use of a routing protocol to determine routes. routeadm is used to enable or disable each function independently, overriding any system default setting for each function. The first usage, above, reports the current configuration. The following command-line options are supported: -p Print the configuration in parseable format. -R root-dir Specify an alternate root directory where routeadm applies changes. This can be useful from within JumpStart scripts, where the root directory of the system being modified is mounted elsewhere. Note - The root file system of any non-global zones must not be referenced with the -R option. Doing so might damage the global zone's file system, might compromise the security of the global zone, and might damage the non-global zone's file system. See zones(5). -e option... Enable the specified option. -d option... Disable the specified option. -r option... Revert the specified option to the system default. The system defaults are specified in the description of each option. -u Apply the currently configured options to the running system. Enable or disable IP forwarding, and/or launch or kill routing daemons. It does not alter the state of the system for those settings that have been set to default. This option is meant to be used by adminis- trators who do not want to reboot to apply their changes. -s var=value Specify string values for specific variables in a comma-separated list with no intervening spaces. If invalid options are specified, a warning message is printed and the program exits. The following variables can be specified: ipv4-routing-daemon=<full_path_to_routing_daemon> Specifies the routing daemon to be started when ipv4-routing is enabled. The routing daemon specified must be an executable binary or shell-script. Default: "/usr/sbin/in.routed" ipv4-routing-daemon-args=<args> Specifies the startup arguments to be passed to the ipv4-routing-daemon when ipv4-routing is enabled. Default: no arguments ipv4-routing-stop-cmd=<command> Specifies the command to be executed to stop the routing daemon when ipv4-routing is disabled. <command> may be an executable binary or shell-script, or a string that can be parsed by system(3C). Default: "kill -TERM `cat /var/run/in.routed.pid`" ipv6-routing-daemon=<full_path_to_routing_daemon> Specifies the routing daemon to be started when ipv6-routing is enabled. The routing daemon specified must be an executable binary or shell-script. Default: "/usr/lib/inet/in.ripngd" ipv6-routing-daemon-args=<args> Specifies the startup arguments to be passed to the ipv6-routing-daemon when ipv6-routing is enabled. Default: "-s" ipv6-routing-stop-cmd=<command> Specifies the command to be executed to stop the routing daemon when ipv6-routing is disabled. <command> can be an executable binary or shell-script, or a string that can be parsed by system(3C). Default: "kill -TERM `cat /var/run/in.ripngd.pid`" Note that, if you change the routing daemon and stop commands from their defaults, routeadm does not monitor these daemons or commands. This is because the status of these programs depends on user configuration. When non-default daemons or stop commands are in use, routeadm always returns a status of "unknown". Multiple -e, -d, and -r options can be specified on the command line. Changes made by -e, -d, and -r are persistent, but are not applied to the running system unless routeadm is called later with the -u option. Use the following options as arguments to the -e, -d, and -r options (shown above as option...). ipv4-forwarding Controls the global forwarding configuration for all IPv4 interfaces. The system default is disabled. If enabled, IP will forward IPv4 packets to and from interfaces when appropriate. If disabled, IP will not forward IPv4 packets to and from interfaces when appropriate. ipv4-routing Determines whether or not an IPv4 routing daemon is run. The system default is enabled unless the /etc/defaultrouter file exists, in which case the default is disabled. The routing daemon for IPv4 is /usr/sbin/in.routed. ipv6-forwarding Controls the global forwarding configuration for all IPv6 interfaces. The system default is disabled. If enabled, IP will forward IPv6 packets to and from interfaces when appropriate. If disabled, IP will not forward IPv6 packets to and from interfaces when appropriate. ipv6-routing Determines whether or not an IPv6 routing daemon is run. The system default is disabled. The routing daemon for IPv6 is /usr/lib/inet/in.ripngd. If not set, the system boot scripts' current default logic determines whether or not to run in.ripngd. Note that even if this option is enabled, an IPv6 routing daemon will run only if ipv6-forwarding is enabled. The forwarding and routing settings are related but not mutually dependent. For example, a router will typically forward IP packets and use a routing protocol, but nothing would prevent an administrator from configuring a router that forwards packets and does not use a routing protocol. In that case, the administrator would enable forwarding, disable routing, and populate the router's routing table with static routes. The forwarding settings are global settings. Each interface also has an IFF_ROUTER forwarding flag that determines whether packets can be forwarded to or from a particular interface. That flag can be independently controlled by means of ifconfig(1M)'s router option. When the global forwarding setting is changed (that is, -u is issued to change the value from enabled to disabled or vice-versa), all interface flags in the system are changed simultaneously to reflect the new global policy. Interfaces configured by means of DHCP automatically have their interface-specific IFF_ROUTER flag cleared. When a new interface is plumbed by means of ifconfig(1M), the value of the interface-specific forwarding flag is set according to the cur- rent global forwarding value. Thus, the forwarding value forms the "default" for all new interfaces. The following exit values are returned: 0 Successful completion. !=0 An error occurred while obtaining or modifying the system configuration. Example 1: Enabling IPv4 Forwarding IPv4 forwarding is disabled by default. The following command enables IPv4 forwarding: example# routeadm -e ipv4-forwarding Example 2: Apply Configured Settings to the Running System In the previous example, a system setting was changed, but will not take effect until the next reboot unless a command such as the follow- ing is used: example# routeadm -u Example 3: Making a Setting Revert to its Default To make the setting changed in the first example revert to its default, enter the following: example# routeadm -r ipv4-forwarding example# routeadm -u Example 4: Starting in.routed with the -q Flag The following sequence of commands starts in.routed with the -q flag: example# routeadm -s ipv4-routing-daemon-args="-q" example# routeadm -u See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes: +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ | ATTRIBUTE TYPE | ATTRIBUTE VALUE | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Availability |SUNWcsu | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ |Interface Stability |Stable | +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+ ifconfig(1M), in.routed(1M), gateways(4), attributes(5) 8 Apr 2005 routeadm(1M)

Featured Tech Videos