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The Lounge What is on Your Mind? Happy New Year 2020 to all :) Post 303042616 by RavinderSingh13 on Wednesday 1st of January 2020 10:21:43 AM
Old 01-01-2020
Happy New Year 2020 to all :)

Hello All,

I would like to wish A very Happy New Year 2020 to all. May GOD bless all of us with TRUE knowledge, wisdom, great attitude, honesty, hard working capability, great health Smilie

Cheers and let us all have fun/learning/sharing/caring on this GREAT forum UNIX.com, love you UNIX.com always SmilieSmilie

Thanks,
R. Singh
These 6 Users Gave Thanks to RavinderSingh13 For This Post:
 
Test Your Knowledge in Computers #114
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Welcome 2016, Happy New Year to All

Hello All, I wanted to wish Happy New Year 2016 to every one in this forum. May GOD gives us strength to do hard work, learn new things, enjoy each and every moment of our life, do new adventurous. Take care and enjoy. Here is a famous quote: Thanks, R. Singh "GOD helps those Who help... (1 Reply)
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CAL(1)							    BSD General Commands Manual 						    CAL(1)

NAME
cal, ncal -- displays a calendar and the date of easter SYNOPSIS
cal [-jy] [[month] year] cal [-j] -m month [year] ncal [-jJpwy] [-s country_code] [[month] year] ncal [-Jeo] [year] DESCRIPTION
The cal utility displays a simple calendar in traditional format and ncal offers an alternative layout, more options and the date of easter. The new format is a little cramped but it makes a year fit on a 25x80 terminal. If arguments are not specified, the current month is dis- played. The options are as follows: -J Display Julian Calendar, if combined with the -e option, display date of easter according to the Julian Calendar. -e Display date of easter (for western churches). -j Display Julian days (days one-based, numbered from January 1). -m month Display the specified month. -o Display date of orthodox easter (Greek and Russian Orthodox Churches). -p Print the country codes and switching days from Julian to Gregorian Calendar as they are assumed by ncal. The country code as deter- mined from the local environment is marked with an asterisk. -s country_code Assume the switch from Julian to Gregorian Calendar at the date associated with the country_code. If not specified, ncal tries to guess the switch date from the local environment or falls back to September 2, 1752. This was when Great Britain and her colonies switched to the Gregorian Calendar. -w Print the number of the week below each week column. -y Display a calendar for the specified year. A single parameter specifies the year (1 - 9999) to be displayed; note the year must be fully specified: ``cal 89'' will not display a calen- dar for 1989. Two parameters denote the month and year; the month is either a number between 1 and 12, or a full or abbreviated name as specified by the current locale. Month and year default to those of the current system clock and time zone (so ``cal -m 8'' will display a calendar for the month of August in the current year). A year starts on Jan 1. SEE ALSO
calendar(3), strftime(3) HISTORY
A cal command appeared in Version 5 AT&T UNIX. The ncal command appeared in FreeBSD 2.2.6. AUTHORS
The ncal command and manual were written by Wolfgang Helbig <helbig@FreeBSD.org>. BUGS
The assignment of Julian--Gregorian switching dates to country codes is historically naive for many countries. BSD
November 23, 2004 BSD

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