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Top Forums UNIX for Advanced & Expert Users CentOS7 restoring file capabilities Post 303026288 by rbatte1 on Friday 23rd of November 2018 11:33:28 AM
Old 11-23-2018
Hello Peasant,

Sorry for the delay, I've been in court for two weeks Smilie . Don't worry, it was only jury service Smilie

Yes! This works wonderfully. I've trimmed it down so finding that the necessary part was just --xattrs-include='security.capability' so I can now prove it with:-
Code:
# tar -cvpzf - --xattrs-include='security.capability' /usr/bin/ping | ( cd /tmp && tar -xzvp --xattrs-include='security.capability' -f - )
tar: Removing leading `/' from member names
/usr/bin/ping
usr/bin/ping

# getcap /tmp/usr/bin/ping
/tmp/usr/bin/ping = cap_net_admin,cap_net_raw+p

This command now works perfectly and I can incorporate it into our kickstart called recovery process with a minor adjustment to the procedure to build the image.

Fantastic.

One wonders why they create so many additional attributes for files and then the default doesn't recover them. I presume it is so that it you try to extract to a server that tar is not expecting them, you don't get horrible errors, but it is frustrating. Oh well Smilie


Thank you very much once again,
Robin
This User Gave Thanks to rbatte1 For This Post:
 

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GZEXE(1)						      General Commands Manual							  GZEXE(1)

NAME
gzexe - compress executable files in place SYNOPSIS
gzexe name ... DESCRIPTION
The gzexe utility allows you to compress executables in place and have them automatically uncompress and execute when you run them (at a penalty in performance). For example if you execute ``gzexe /usr/bin/gdb'' it will create the following two files: -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 1026675 Jun 7 13:53 /usr/bin/gdb -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 2304524 May 30 13:02 /usr/bin/gdb~ /usr/bin/gdb~ is the original file and /usr/bin/gdb is the self-uncompressing executable file. You can remove /usr/bin/gdb~ once you are sure that /usr/bin/gdb works properly. This utility is most useful on systems with very small disks. OPTIONS
-d Decompress the given executables instead of compressing them. SEE ALSO
gzip(1), znew(1), zmore(1), zcmp(1), zforce(1) CAVEATS
The compressed executable is a shell script. This may create some security holes. In particular, the compressed executable relies on the PATH environment variable to find gzip and some standard utilities (basename, chmod, ln, mkdir, mktemp, rm, sleep, and tail). BUGS
gzexe attempts to retain the original file attributes on the compressed executable, but you may have to fix them manually in some cases, using chmod or chown. GZEXE(1)

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