Sponsored Content
Full Discussion: IBM Servers Documentation
Operating Systems AIX IBM Servers Documentation Post 302560776 by Vit0_Corleone on Saturday 1st of October 2011 05:30:18 AM
Old 10-01-2011
Yes I mean some software with a some backend database to store system configuration... anyway thanks a lot :-)
 

4 More Discussions You Might Find Interesting

1. UNIX for Advanced & Expert Users

HP-UX 10.2 servers interoperability with IBM mass storage devices

Does anyone have succesfully interconnected HP-UX 10.2 HP 9000 K370 servers with A6885A HBA's, with an IBM Fastt storage server? I need to replace integrate both platforms. Interoperability matrices from manufacturers do not certified such integration. Thanks for anybody's help. (0 Replies)
Discussion started by: raltmannr
0 Replies

2. Solaris

Documentation on connecting EMC storage to Solaris servers

Hi Can anyone suggest me some documents for EMC clarion documents which I am going to use in the servers with solaris environments. (1 Reply)
Discussion started by: ningy
1 Replies

3. AIX

executable problems with shell script in IBM servers

We have a java stand alone application running currently on sun Solaris system. The java application runs on Jdk 1.4. We are reshooting this java application to new Ibm servers. There are 10 unix scripts for this application. All scripts works well except one shell script, This shell... (2 Replies)
Discussion started by: poojagupta
2 Replies

4. AIX

IBM TDS/SDS (LDAP) - can I mix endianness among servers in an instance ?

I'd like to add some x/linux-based servers to my current AIX-based TDS/SDS server community. Reading the Fine Install Guide (rtfig ?) I believe this may be covered by the section "Upgrade an instance of a previous version to a different computer" i.e. I'm going to install latest/greatest SDS on a... (4 Replies)
Discussion started by: maraixadm
4 Replies
NETRESTRICT(5)							AFS File Reference						    NETRESTRICT(5)

NAME
NetRestrict - Defines interfaces not to register with AFS servers DESCRIPTION
There are two NetRestrict files, one for an AFS client and one for an AFS File Server or database server. The AFS client NetRestrict file specifies the IP addresses that the client should not register with the File Servers it connects to. The server NetRestrict file specifies what interfaces should not be registered with AFS Database Servers or used to talk to other database servers. Client NetRestrict The NetRestrict file, if present in a client machine's /etc/openafs directory, defines the IP addresses of the interfaces that the local Cache Manager does not register with a File Server when first establishing a connection to it. For an explanation of how the File Server uses the registered interfaces, see NetInfo(5). As it initializes, the Cache Manager constructs a list of interfaces to register, from the /etc/openafs/NetInfo file if it exists, or from the list of interfaces configured with the operating system otherwise. The Cache Manager then removes from the list any addresses that appear in the NetRestrict file, if it exists. The Cache Manager records the resulting list in kernel memory. The NetRestrict file is in ASCII format. One IP address appears on each line, in dotted decimal format. The order of the addresses is not significant. The value 255 is a wildcard that represents all possible addresses in that field. For example, the value 192.12.105.255 indicates that the Cache Manager does not register any of the addresses in the 192.12.105 subnet. To display the addresses the Cache Manager is currently registering with File Servers, use the fs getclientaddrs command. Server NetRestrict The NetRestrict file, if present in the /var/lib/openafs/local directory, defines the following: o On a file server machine, the local interfaces that the File Server (fileserver process) does not register in the Volume Location Database (VLDB) at initialization time. o On a database server machine, the local interfaces that the Ubik synchronization library does not use when communicating with the database server processes running on other database server machines. As it initializes, the File Server constructs a list of interfaces to register, from the /var/lib/openafs/local/NetInfo file if it exists, or from the list of interfaces configured with the operating system otherwise. The File Server then removes from the list any addresses that appear in the NetRestrict file, if it exists. The File Server records the resulting list in the /var/lib/openafs/local/sysid file and registers the interfaces in the VLDB. The database server processes use a similar procedure when initializing, to determine which interfaces to use for communication with the peer processes on other database machines in the cell. The NetRestrict file is in ASCII format. One IP address appears on each line, in dotted decimal format. The order of the addresses is not significant. To display the File Server interface addresses registered in the VLDB, use the vos listaddrs command. SEE ALSO
NetInfo(5), sysid(5), vldb.DB0(5), fileserver(8), fs_getclientaddrs(1) vos_listaddrs(1) COPYRIGHT
IBM Corporation 2000. <http://www.ibm.com/> All Rights Reserved. This documentation is covered by the IBM Public License Version 1.0. It was converted from HTML to POD by software written by Chas Williams and Russ Allbery, based on work by Alf Wachsmann and Elizabeth Cassell. OpenAFS 2012-03-26 NETRESTRICT(5)

Featured Tech Videos

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:24 PM.
Unix & Linux Forums Content Copyright 1993-2022. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy