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Special Forums UNIX and Linux Applications Is Virtualisation Right for Colo? Post 302192193 by Karma on Tuesday 6th of May 2008 08:29:29 AM
Old 05-06-2008
Is Virtualisation Right for Colo?

Hi guys

I'm going to be moving a linux box into collocation to support the growing demands of my sites and have been trying to figure out if Xen is right for me. I'd appreciate hearing some real-world experience with the overhead involved and the optimal ways to slice up a box. Right now I feel I should either do an all-in-one setup with a hardened installation, use Xen to virtualise services I would normally run on other machines (such as DNS and SQL) and/or use Xen to rent out VPSes.

My main concern is that I don't have unlimited resources on this box, it's a dual p4-style 3.06GHz xeon with HT and 4 gigs of old ddr. So far I am going to need to accommodate the following:
- about 100,000 script-generated page views a day, with room for spikes, floods and other attacks
- dns services for about 30 domains, only three well traveled
- sql
- mail

Is Xen practical for my situation? I'm intrigued by the ability to replace and migrate virtual servers in a snap but not sure if the performance cost makes it more effective than a traditional solution. Any input is appreciated!
 

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XEN-DELETE-IMAGE(8)					 Perl Programmers Reference Guide				       XEN-DELETE-IMAGE(8)

NAME
xen-delete-image - Delete previously created Xen instances. SYNOPSIS
xen-delete-image [options] [--hostname=]imageName1 [--hostname=]imageName2 Help Options: --help Show help information. --manual Read the manual for this script. --version Show the version information and exit. --verbose Show diagnostic output. General options: --dir Specify the output directory where images were previously saved. --evms Specify the EVMS container to use. --lvm Specify the LVM volume to use. Specifying hosts: --hostname Specify the image name to delete. Testing options: --test Don't complain if we're not invoked by root. OPTIONS
--dir Specify the output directory where images were previously saved. --evms Specify the EVMS container where images were previously saved. --help Show help information. --hostname Specify the hostname to delete. --lvm Specify the LVM volume group where images were previously saved. --manual Read the manual for this script. --test Do not complain, or exit, if the script is not executed by the root user. --version Show the version number and exit. DESCRIPTION
xen-delete-image is a simple script which allows you to delete Xen instances which have previously been created by xen-create-image. You must be root to run this script as it removes the Xen configuration file from /etc/xen and potentially removes LVM and EVMS volumes. (When invoked with the '--test' flag the script will continue running, but will fail to remove anything which the user does not have permission to delete.) LOOPBACK EXAMPLE
Assuming that you have three images 'foo', 'bar', and 'baz', stored beneath /home/xen the first two may be deleted via: xen-delete-image --dir=/home/xen foo bar You may also delete them by running: xen-delete-image --dir=/home/xen --hostname=foo --hostname=bar (The matching Xen configuration files beneath /etc/xen will also be removed.) LVM EXAMPLE
Assuming that you have the volume group 'skx-vol' containing three Xen instances 'foo', 'bar', and 'baz' the first two may be deleted via: xen-delete-image --lvm=skx-vol foo bar This will remove the volumes 'foo-disk', 'foo-swap', 'bar-disk', and 'bar-swap'. Note that if the images were created with "--noswap" then the swap volumes will not be present, so will not need to be deleted. The Xen configuration files will also be removed from beneath /etc/xen. EVMS EXAMPLE
Assuming that you have the container 'mycontainer' containing three Xen instances 'foo', 'bar', and 'baz' the first two may be deleted via: xen-delete-image --evms=lvm2/mycontainer --hostname=foo --hostname=bar This will remove the volumes 'foo-disk', 'foo-swap', 'bar-disk', and 'bar-swap'. Note that if the images were created with "--noswap" then the swap volumes will not be present, so will not need to be deleted. The Xen configuration files will also be removed. AUTHORS
Steve Kemp, http://www.steve.org.uk/ Axel Beckert, http://noone.org/abe/ StA~Xphane Jourdois LICENSE
Copyright (c) 2005-2009 by Steve Kemp, (c) 2010 by The Xen-Tools Development Team. All rights reserved. This module is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the same terms as Perl itself. The LICENSE file contains the full text of the license. 4.3.1 2012-06-30 XEN-DELETE-IMAGE(8)

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