Sponsored Content
Full Discussion: mounting vfat...
Special Forums Hardware Filesystems, Disks and Memory mounting vfat... Post 16550 by AtleRamsli on Monday 4th of March 2002 09:38:39 AM
Old 03-04-2002
I can be of a little help here, at least tell you what to look for.
I searched for a 'mount-HOWTO' or 'MSDOSFS-HOWTO' but didn't find it - but there is a document in the Linux documentation that explains how you can set ownership of the VFAT partition to a particular user, so only that user, group, etc, +root can access it.

See man mount under

mount options for vfat

uid=x, gid=y

Atle
PS: I assume it is Linux because of the partition names, and the fact that you must be running a LinAMD machine (LinAMD is the PC equivalent of SolSPARC, etc)

Last edited by AtleRamsli; 03-04-2002 at 11:53 AM..
 

8 More Discussions You Might Find Interesting

1. Filesystems, Disks and Memory

Newbie: RH Linux: Mounting vfat as readable

Hi there! I have a question about mounting a file system as readable. I have the following line in my fstab for that purpose: /dev/hda1 /mnt/nt vfat defaults 0 0 It mounts the filesystem but I can only read from this, not write :( what do I have to change to make it readable? TIA! (4 Replies)
Discussion started by: D-Lexy
4 Replies

2. Filesystems, Disks and Memory

Mounting...?

Hi everyone, this is the first time I have ever properly used Linux - I run Red Hat Linux 8. I have two hardrives, my main 80gig, and my "extra" 15gig, I would like to be able to gain access to my 15gig and view the files. I know to view files on a floppy disk or a cd you need to mount the... (1 Reply)
Discussion started by: mo0ness
1 Replies

3. UNIX for Dummies Questions & Answers

Mounting help.

Hello, I am trying to mount a second scsi hard drive on a SCO box. (5.0.5.) And I can't figure out what the device file for it is so I can mount it. Can anyone help me? thanks. (1 Reply)
Discussion started by: iconn
1 Replies

4. Solaris

mounting windows(vfat) file system

how can i mount windows file system into solaris using vfstab or mount command. also please tell me how to display the partition information. (1 Reply)
Discussion started by: ajoy patel
1 Replies

5. BSD

Mounting

Hi I mounted disk which have two partition C: , D: ( i am not sure if both partition have same file system) with this commad: mount -t msdosfs /dev/ad2s1 /mnt/windows but this is mounted only first partition with fat file system. ( in windows XP C: ) How can i mount another partition... (2 Replies)
Discussion started by: sniper007
2 Replies

6. Ubuntu

rdiff-backup using escape codes on vfat thumbdrive

I thought it may be nice to use rdiff-backup to backup my websites to a thumb drive. But all the capital letters are substituted with octal escape codes. How can I over come this? There are no issues backing up to another ext3 drive. The source drive is ext3 the thumb drive is vfat mounted... (0 Replies)
Discussion started by: mikemc
0 Replies

7. Filesystems, Disks and Memory

mounting

I generally use mount many times to mount an iso image or as a bind between directories or mounting a squash file system. Y does one require root permission to do a mount --bind between two of his own directories or just mount an iso/squash image in directory he owns? Also I wish mount had an... (0 Replies)
Discussion started by: bbala
0 Replies

8. Shell Programming and Scripting

Mounting

I have a big confusion in mounting........so please tell me whats the exact meaning of it nd do other os have this concept or not? (8 Replies)
Discussion started by: Mac91
8 Replies
FILESYSTEMS(5)						     Linux Programmer's Manual						    FILESYSTEMS(5)

NAME
filesystems - Linux filesystem types: minix, ext, ext2, ext3, xia, msdos, umsdos, vfat, proc, nfs, iso9660, hpfs, sysv, smb, ncpfs DESCRIPTION
When, as is customary, the proc filesystem is mounted on /proc, you can find in the file /proc/filesystems which filesystems your kernel currently supports. If you need a currently unsupported one, insert the corresponding module or recompile the kernel. In order to use a filesystem, you have to mount it, see mount(8) for the mount command, and for the available mount options. Below a short description of a few of the available filesystems. minix is the filesystem used in the Minix operating system, the first to run under Linux. It has a number of shortcomings: a 64MB partition size limit, short filenames, a single time stamp, etc. It remains useful for floppies and RAM disks. ext is an elaborate extension of the minix filesystem. It has been completely superseded by the second version of the extended filesystem (ext2) and has been removed from the kernel (in 2.1.21). ext2 is the high performance disk filesystem used by Linux for fixed disks as well as removable media. The second extended filesystem was designed as an extension of the extended file system (ext). ext2 offers the best performance (in terms of speed and CPU usage) of the filesystems supported under Linux. ext3 is a journaling version of the ext2 filesystem. It is easy to switch back and forth between ext2 and ext3. ext3 is a journaling version of the ext2 filesystem. ext3 offers the most complete set of journaling options available among journaling filesystems. xiafs was designed and implemented to be a stable, safe filesystem by extending the Minix filesystem code. It provides the basic most requested features without undue complexity. The xia filesystem is no longer actively developed or maintained. It was removed from the kernel in 2.1.21. msdos is the filesystem used by DOS, Windows, and some OS/2 computers. msdos filenames can be no longer than 8 characters, followed by an optional period and 3 character extension. umsdos is an extended DOS filesystem used by Linux. It adds capability for long filenames, UID/GID, POSIX permissions, and special files (devices, named pipes, etc.) under the DOS filesystem, without sacrificing compatibility with DOS. vfat is an extended DOS filesystem used by Microsoft Windows95 and Windows NT. VFAT adds the capability to use long filenames under the MSDOS filesystem. proc is a pseudo-filesystem which is used as an interface to kernel data structures rather than reading and interpreting /dev/kmem. In particular, its files do not take disk space. See proc(5). iso9660 is a CD-ROM filesystem type conforming to the ISO 9660 standard. High Sierra Linux supports High Sierra, the precursor to the ISO 9660 standard for CD-ROM filesystems. It is automatically recognized within the iso9660 filesystem support under Linux. Rock Ridge Linux also supports the System Use Sharing Protocol records specified by the Rock Ridge Interchange Protocol. They are used to further describe the files in the iso9660 filesystem to a UNIX host, and provide information such as long filenames, UID/GID, POSIX permissions, and devices. It is automatically recognized within the iso9660 filesystem support under Linux. hpfs is the High Performance Filesystem, used in OS/2. This filesystem is read-only under Linux due to the lack of available documentation. sysv is an implementation of the SystemV/Coherent filesystem for Linux. It implements all of Xenix FS, SystemV/386 FS, and Coherent FS. nfs is the network filesystem used to access disks located on remote computers. smb is a network filesystem that supports the SMB protocol, used by Windows for Workgroups, Windows NT, and Lan Manager. To use smb fs, you need a special mount program, which can be found in the ksmbfs package, found at ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/Filesystems/smbfs. ncpfs is a network filesystem that supports the NCP protocol, used by Novell NetWare. To use ncpfs, you need special programs, which can be found at ftp://linux01.gwdg.de/pub/ncpfs. SEE ALSO
proc(5), fsck(8), mkfs(8), mount(8) 2001-12-07 FILESYSTEMS(5)

Featured Tech Videos

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:24 PM.
Unix & Linux Forums Content Copyright 1993-2022. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy