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typeset(1)				  User Commands 			       typeset(1)

NAME
       typeset,  whence  -  shell  built-in  functions to set/get attributes and values for shell
       variables and functions

SYNOPSIS
       typeset [+- HLRZfilrtux [n]] [name[=value]]...

       whence [-pv] name...

   ksh93
       ++typeset [+-AHflbnprtux] [+-EFLRZi[n]] [vname[=value]]

       whence [-afpv] name...

DESCRIPTION
   ksh
       typeset sets attributes and values for shell variables  and  functions.	When  typeset  is
       invoked	inside a function, a new instance of the variables name is created. The variables
       value and type are restored when the function completes. The following list of  attributes
       can be specified:

       -f    The  names refer to function names rather than variable names. No assignments can be
	     made and the only other valid flags are -t, -u and -x. The flag -t turns  on  execu-
	     tion  tracing for this function. The flag -u causes this function to be marked unde-
	     fined. The FPATH variable is searched to find the function definition when the func-
	     tion  is  referenced. The flag -x allows the function definition to remain in effect
	     across shell procedures invoked by name.

       -H    This flag provides UNIX to hostname file mapping on non-UNIX machines.

       -i    Parameter is an integer. This makes arithmetic faster. If n is non-zero  it  defines
	     the  output  arithmetic  base; otherwise, the first assignment determines the output
	     base.

       -l    All uppercase characters are converted to	lowercase.  The  uppercase  flag,  -u  is
	     turned off.

       -L    Left  justify  and remove leading blanks from value. If n is non-zero it defines the
	     width of the field; otherwise, it is determined by the width of the value	of  first
	     assignment.  When the variable is assigned to, it is filled on the right with blanks
	     or truncated, if necessary, to fit into the field. Leading zeros are removed if  the
	     -Z flag is also set. The -R flag is turned off.

       -r    The  specified names are marked readonly and these names cannot be changed by subse-
	     quent assignment.

       -R    Right justify and fill with leading blanks. If n is non-zero it defines the width of
	     the field, otherwise it is determined by the width of the value of first assignment.
	     The field is left filled with blanks or truncated from the end if	the  variable  is
	     reassigned. The -L flag is turned off.

       -t    Tags  the	variables.  Tags  are  user  definable and have no special meaning to the
	     shell.

       -u    All lowercase characters are converted to uppercase characters. The lowercase  flag,
	     -l is turned off.

       -x    The  specified  names  are  marked for automatic export to the environment of subse-
	     quently-executed commands.

       -Z    Right justify and fill with leading zeros if the  first  non-blank  character  is	a
	     digit and the -L flag has not been set. If n is non-zero it defines the width of the
	     field. Otherwise, it is determined by the width of the value of first assignment.

       The -i attribute can not be specified along with -R, -L, -Z, or -f.

       Using + rather than - causes these flags to be turned off. If no name arguments are speci-
       fied but flags are specified, a list of names (and optionally the values) of the variables
       which have these flags set is printed. (Using + rather than - keeps the values from  being
       printed.)  If  no names and flags are specified, the names and attributes of all variables
       are printed.

       For each name, whence indicates how it would be interpreted if used as a command name.

       The -v flag produces a more verbose report.

       The -p flag does a path search for name even if	name  is  an  alias,  a  function,  or	a
       reserved word.

       On  this  manual  page,	ksh(1) commands that are preceded by one or two * (asterisks) are
       treated specially in the following ways:

	   1.	  Variable assignment lists preceding the command remain in effect when the  com-
		  mand completes.

	   2.	  I/O redirections are processed after variable assignments.

	   3.	  Errors cause a script that contains them to abort.

	   4.	  Words,  following a command preceded by ** that are in the format of a variable
		  assignment, are expanded with the same rules as  a  variable	assignment.  This
		  means  that tilde substitution is performed after the = sign and word splitting
		  and file name generation are not performed.

   ksh93
       If the -f option is not specified, typeset sets, unsets, or displays attributes	of  vari-
       ables  as  specified  with the options. If the first option is specified with a - then the
       attributes are set for each of the specified names. If the first option is specified  with
       a  +,  then  the specified attributes are unset. If =value is specified, value is assigned
       before the attributes are set.

       When typeset is called inside a function that is defined with the function reserved  word,
       and name does not contain a ., a local variable statically scoped to that function is cre-
       ated.

       Not all option combinations are possible. For example, the numeric options -i, -E, and  -F
       cannot be specified with the justification options -L, -R, and -Z.

       The following preset aliases are set by the shell:

       float	    typeset -E

       functions    typeset -f

       integer	    typeset -i

       nameref	    typeset -n

       If no names are specified, variables that have the specified options are displayed. If the
       first option is specified with a leading - then the name and value  of  each  variable  is
       written	to  standard output. Otherwise, only the names are written. If no options or only
       the -p option are  specified,  the  names  and  attributes  of  all  variables  that  have
       attributes  are	written to standard output. When -f is specified, the names displayed are
       function names.

       If -f is specified, then each name refers to a function and the only valid options are  -u
       and -t. In this case no =value can be specified.

       typeset	is  built-in  to  the  shell as a declaration command so that field splitting and
       pathname expansion are not performed on the arguments. Tilde expansion occurs on value.

       The following options are supported by the typeset built-in command in ksh93:

       -a	    Indexed array. This is the default.

       -A	    Associative array. Each name is converted to an associative array. If a vari-
		    able already exists, the current value becomes index 0.

       -b	    Each  name	can contain binary data. Its value is the mime base64 encoding of
		    the data. This option can be used with -Z, to specify fixed sized fields.

       -E [n]	    Floating point number represented in scientific  notation.	n  specifies  the
		    number  of	significant figures when the value is expanded. The default value
		    is 10.

       -f	    Each of the options and names refers to a function.

       -F [n]	    Floating point. n is the number of places after the decimal  point	when  the
		    value is expanded. The default value is 10.

       -H	    Hostname  mapping. Each name holds a native pathname. Assigning a UNIX format
		    pathname causes it to be converted to a pathname  suitable	for  the  current
		    host. This has no effect when the native system is UNIX.

       -i [base]    An	integer.  base	represents  the  arithmetic base from 2 to 64. The option
		    value can be omitted. The default value is 10.

       -l	    Convert uppercase characters to lowercase characters. Unsets the  -u  option.
		    When used with -i, -E, or -F indicates long variant.

       -L [n]	    Left  justify.  If	n  is specified, it represents the field width. If the -Z
		    attribute is also specified, then leading  zeros  are  stripped.  The  option
		    value can be omitted.

       -n	    Name  reference.  The  value  is the name of a variable that name references.
		    name cannot contain a ..

       -p	    Causes the output to be in a format that can be used as input to the shell to
		    recreate the attributes for variables.

       -r	    Enables  read-only.  Once  this option is enabled, it cannot be disabled. See
		    readonly(1).

       -R [n]	    Right justify. If n is specified it represents the field  width.  If  the  -Z
		    option  is	also  specified, zeros are used as the fill character. Otherwise,
		    SPACEs are used.

       -s	    Restricts integer size to short when used with -i.

       -t	    When used with -f, enables tracing for each of the specified functions.  Oth-
		    erwise, -t is a user defined attribute and has no meaning to the shell.

       -T tname     tname is the name of a type name given to each name.

       -u	    Without  -f  or -i, converts lowercase characters to uppercase and unsets -l.
		    When used with -f, specifies that name is a function that has  not	yet  been
		    loaded.  When  used  with  -i  specifies  that  the  value is displayed as an
		    unsigned integer.

       -x	    Puts each name on the export list. See export(1). name cannot contain a ..

       -Z [n]	    Zero fill. If n is specified it represents the field width. The option  value
		    can be omitted.

       The following exit values are returned by typeset in ksh93:

       0     Successful completion.

       >0    An error occurred.

       If the -v is not specified, whence writes on standard output an absolute pathname, if any,
       corresponding to name based on the complete search order that the shell uses. If  name  is
       not found, no output is produced.

       If  the	-v  is specified, the output from whence also contains information that indicates
       how the specified name would be interpreted by the shell in the current execution environ-
       ment.

       The following options are supported by the whence built-in command in ksh93:

       -a    Display all uses for each name rather than the first.

       -f    Do not check for functions.

       -p    Do not check to see if name is a reserved word, a built-in, an alias, or a function.

       -v    For  each	name  specified, the shell displays a line that indicates if that name is
	     one of the following:

		 o	Reserved word

		 o	Alias

		 o	Built-in

		 o	Undefined function

		 o	Function

		 o	Tracked alias

		 o	Program

		 o	Not found

       The following exit values are returned by whence in ksh93:

       0     Successful completion. Each name was found by the shell.

       1     One or more names were not found by the shell.

       >1    An error occurred.

       On this manual page, ksh93(1) commands that are preceded by one or two + (plus signs)  are
       treated specially in the following ways:

	   1.	  Variable  assignment lists preceding the command remain in effect when the com-
		  mand completes.

	   2.	  I/O redirections are processed after variable assignments.

	   3.	  Errors cause a script that contains them to abort.

	   4.	  They are not valid function names.

	   5.	  Words, following a command preceded by ++ that are in the format of a  variable
		  assignment,  are  expanded  with  the same rules as a variable assignment. This
		  means that tilde substitution is performed after the = sign and word	splitting
		  and file name generation are not performed.

ATTRIBUTES
       See attributes(5) for descriptions of the following attributes:

       +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+
       |      ATTRIBUTE TYPE	     |	    ATTRIBUTE VALUE	   |
       +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+
       |Availability		     |SUNWcsu			   |
       +-----------------------------+-----------------------------+

SEE ALSO
       ksh(1), ksh93(1), readonly(1)set(1), sh(1), attributes(5)

SunOS 5.11				   13 Mar 2008				       typeset(1)
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