Unix/Linux Go Back    


Homework & Coursework Questions Students must use and complete the template provided. If you don't, your post may be deleted! Special homework rules apply here.

Help on Reading UNIX Programming Books.

Homework & Coursework Questions


Closed    
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
    #1  
Old Unix and Linux 04-18-2016
vectrum vectrum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Last Activity: 17 August 2016, 12:28 AM EDT
Location: Stephen Court
Posts: 34
Thanks: 14
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Help on Reading UNIX Programming Books.

I've purchased few unix/linux programming books and also planning to buy couple of books in future. I've got the following books;

Advanced Unix Programming(2nd ed) -- M. Rochkind.

Advanced Programming on Unix Environment(3rd ed) -- Late Rick Stevens & Rago.

Unix Systems Programming - Concurrency and Threads -- Robbins & Robbins.

I'd, also like to buy Linux programming interface (Kerrisk) and Understanding Unix/Linux Progrmming.. (Moley), but, I can't afford to buy those two books now.

Plz tell me which books I should begin with and which one I should study next when I finish (or after gaining some experiences) the first book.

Thank you.
Sponsored Links
    #2  
Old Unix and Linux 04-18-2016
gandolf989 gandolf989 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Last Activity: 21 July 2017, 4:19 PM EDT
Location: Pittsburgh
Posts: 258
Thanks: 4
Thanked 48 Times in 47 Posts
IMHO, books are a bad investment. You should try to come up with scripting project that you can work on. You can also look through the posts here for things that people are working on and either try to understand and verify other people answers or even improve on other people's answers. It's fine to read about programming, but at some point you need to go and do it. If there is a particular snippet of code that you are trying to write finding it in a book will take more time than googling it. Therefore it gets easier to see what you can find from google than to pull out a physical book that might or might not have a good example for what you are trying to accomplish. You may also just want to focus on Bash with perhaps some awk and sed thrown in.
Sponsored Links
    #3  
Old Unix and Linux 04-18-2016
vectrum vectrum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Last Activity: 17 August 2016, 12:28 AM EDT
Location: Stephen Court
Posts: 34
Thanks: 14
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I want to learn unix system programming with the api(s) for system calls and std libs of C. I feel uneasy reading e-books so I bought hard copies.
I'm learning shl scripting.
Thnx.
    #4  
Old Unix and Linux 04-18-2016
drl's Unix or Linux Image
drl drl is online now Forum Advisor  
Registered Voter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Last Activity: 21 July 2017, 8:15 PM EDT
Location: Saint Paul, MN USA / BSD, CentOS, Debian, OS X, Solaris
Posts: 2,138
Thanks: 210
Thanked 392 Times in 340 Posts
Hi.

I like books. I like the feel, and I like that I can write notes in them.

However, no one can advise you unless you say what your goals are. System programmer, designer, software craftsman, system administrator, etc.

Best wishes ... cheers, drl
Sponsored Links
    #5  
Old Unix and Linux 04-18-2016
vectrum vectrum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Last Activity: 17 August 2016, 12:28 AM EDT
Location: Stephen Court
Posts: 34
Thanks: 14
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
system programming of course, but one has to start from the beginning.
Sponsored Links
    #6  
Old Unix and Linux 04-18-2016
drl's Unix or Linux Image
drl drl is online now Forum Advisor  
Registered Voter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Last Activity: 21 July 2017, 8:15 PM EDT
Location: Saint Paul, MN USA / BSD, CentOS, Debian, OS X, Solaris
Posts: 2,138
Thanks: 210
Thanked 392 Times in 340 Posts
Hi.

OK, assuming this is what you are aiming at:
Quote:
System programming (or systems programming) is the activity of programming computer system software. The primary distinguishing characteristic of systems programming when compared to application programming is that application programming aims to produce software which provides services to the user directly (e.g. word processor), whereas systems programming aims to produce software and software platforms which provide services to other software, are performance constrained, or both (e.g. operating systems, computational science applications, game engines and AAA video games, industrial automation, and software as a service applications).
-- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_programming

Then starting from the beginning:
Quote:
Who Should Read This Book

You should read this book if you are an experienced Unix programmer who is often in the position of either educating novice programmers or debating partisans of other operating systems, and you find it hard to articulate the benefits of the Unix approach.

You should read this book if you are a C, C++, or Java programmer with experience on other operating systems and you are about to start a Unix-based project.

You should read this book if you are a Unix user with novice-level up to middle-level skills in the operating system, but little development experience, and want to learn how to design software effectively under Unix.

You should read this book if you are a non-Unix programmer who has figured out that the Unix tradition might have something to teach you. We believe you're right, and that the Unix philosophy can be exported to other operating systems. So we will pay more attention to non-Unix environments (especially Microsoft operating systems) than is usual in a Unix book; and when tools and case studies are portable, we say so.

You should read this book if you are an application architect considering platforms or implementation strategies for a major general-market or vertical application. It will help you understand the strengths of Unix as a development platform, and of the Unix tradition of open source as a development method.

You should not read this book if what you are looking for is the details of C coding or how to use the Unix kernel API. There are many good books on these topics; Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment [Stevens92] is classic among explorations of the Unix API, and The Practice of Programming [Kernighan-Pike99] is recommended reading for all C programmers (indeed for all programmers in any language).
-- The Art of Unix Programming
It is old, but is available on-line if you wish to see if it is worthwhile --
http://www.catb.org/esr/writings/taoup/html/

Still in stock at --
http://www.amazon.com/UNIX-Programming-Addison-Wesley-Professional-Computng/dp/0131429019/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1461011072&sr=8-1&keywords=art+of+unix+programming

Best wishes ... cheers, drl
Sponsored Links
    #7  
Old Unix and Linux 04-18-2016
vectrum vectrum is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Last Activity: 17 August 2016, 12:28 AM EDT
Location: Stephen Court
Posts: 34
Thanks: 14
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks. I've got the copy but it's more on programming philosophy.
I have to soil my hands by opening, reading, writing and closing
files with sys calls and using std. lib with the same functionality.
There are plenty of other jobs to do.
Sponsored Links
Closed

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Linux More UNIX and Linux Forum Topics You Might Find Helpful
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How does unix system administration, unix programming, unix network programming differ? thulasidharan2k UNIX for Dummies Questions & Answers 0 06-09-2011 09:40 AM
help with C programming (reading from files and printing them) (not C++) omega666 Programming 1 02-03-2011 02:37 AM
i need books (programming shell) osamasam Shell Programming and Scripting 2 10-28-2008 03:40 PM
Carreer:Networking Programming in Unix (C programming Language) vibhory2j UNIX for Dummies Questions & Answers 5 09-05-2008 07:57 PM
Unix Books Astudent UNIX for Dummies Questions & Answers 13 03-18-2001 09:39 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:37 PM.