Unix/Linux Go Back    


BSD BSD, sometimes called Berkeley Unix, is a Unix operating system developed by the Computer Systems Research Group of the UC Berkeley.

Which UNIX / Linux to build a new machine with?

BSD


Closed    
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
    #1  
Old Unix and Linux 08-18-2013
grips03 grips03 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Last Activity: 18 November 2013, 10:21 PM EST
Posts: 12
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Which UNIX / Linux to build a new machine with?

Is freeBSD a good choice for new Unix machine? I want to get back into Unix / Linux. System would be used for light scripting and file server needs. Something with nice software or hardware raid support would be good. If it could support virtual machines, kind of like VMWare's ESX that would be great too.

Other choices are Ubuntu, SUSE, RH, etc.
Sponsored Links
    #2  
Old Unix and Linux 08-18-2013
Scott's Unix or Linux Image
Scott Scott is offline Forum Staff  
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Last Activity: 30 January 2017, 10:27 AM EST
Location: Zürich
Posts: 8,601
Thanks: 344
Thanked 1,093 Times in 949 Posts
Personally I would recommend RedHat as it's the most widely adopted commercial distribution available[citation needed]. Although RedHat isn't free (you pay for the support), Fedora, CentOS and Scientific Linux are all based on the same distriibution, and are freely available.

"If it could support virtual machines"? You mean if the VM could act as a hypervisor, like ESX, or if it's possible to run the OS in a VM? Both are possible in RHEL and, I imagine, any other distro.
The Following User Says Thank You to Scott For This Useful Post:
grips03 (08-18-2013)
Sponsored Links
    #3  
Old Unix and Linux 08-18-2013
grips03 grips03 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Last Activity: 18 November 2013, 10:21 PM EST
Posts: 12
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott View Post
Personally I would recommend RedHat as it's the most widely adopted commercial distribution available[citation needed]. Although RedHat isn't free (you pay for the support), Fedora, CentOS and Scientific Linux are all based on the same distriibution, and are freely available.

"If it could support virtual machines"? You mean if the VM could act as a hypervisor, like ESX, or if it's possible to run the OS in a VM? Both are possible in RHEL and, I imagine, any other distro.
To run virtual machines on it.
    #4  
Old Unix and Linux 08-24-2013
figaro figaro is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Last Activity: 27 August 2016, 2:57 PM EDT
Posts: 842
Thanks: 93
Thanked 29 Times in 25 Posts
Given that this post is in the BSD subforum, from all the BSD distributions I would recommend FreeBSD. The community is larger, most packages available on Linux are also available on FreeBSD, releases are frequent and it offers enterprise-grade reliability.
Sponsored Links
    #5  
Old Unix and Linux 08-24-2013
Scott's Unix or Linux Image
Scott Scott is offline Forum Staff  
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Last Activity: 30 January 2017, 10:27 AM EST
Location: Zürich
Posts: 8,601
Thanks: 344
Thanked 1,093 Times in 949 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by figaro View Post
Given that this post is in the BSD subforum, from all the BSD distributions I would recommend FreeBSD. The community is larger, most packages available on Linux are also available on FreeBSD, releases are frequent and it offers enterprise-grade reliability.
If this was a car question, and posted in a Ford forum, despite all the available Fords, I would still recommend a Mercedes Linux
Sponsored Links
    #6  
Old Unix and Linux 09-13-2013
RichardET RichardET is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Last Activity: 12 December 2016, 11:19 PM EST
Location: Princeton
Posts: 19
Thanks: 3
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by grips03 View Post
Is freeBSD a good choice for new Unix machine? I want to get back into Unix / Linux. System would be used for light scripting and file server needs. Something with nice software or hardware raid support would be good. If it could support virtual machines, kind of like VMWare's ESX that would be great too.

Other choices are Ubuntu, SUSE, RH, etc.
I would use OpenBSD - the ports system is easier to use and the amd64 version is really quite good. But I also like the FreeBSD community - so if you want to experiment, try FreeBSD as well.
Sponsored Links
Closed

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Linux More UNIX and Linux Forum Topics You Might Find Helpful
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
shell script to copy files frm a linux machine to a windows machine using SCP nithin6034 Shell Programming and Scripting 3 07-21-2011 01:56 AM
compare/diff two directory in two different linux/unix machine chuikingman Red Hat 3 09-24-2009 11:37 AM
I want to cheaply build my own Linux/Unix PC, but don't know where to start Mr. Nice Guy UNIX for Dummies Questions & Answers 4 12-19-2005 09:47 PM
Advice to build a cheap Unix machine? alan UNIX for Dummies Questions & Answers 2 09-21-2004 12:34 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:34 PM.